UDN
Search public documentation:

GearsMods
日本語訳
中国翻译
한국어

Interested in the Unreal Engine?
Visit the Unreal Technology site.

Looking for jobs and company info?
Check out the Epic games site.

Questions about support via UDN?
Contact the UDN Staff

UE3 Home > Mod Home > Gears of War Mod Home > Mod Authoring for Gears of War

Mod Authoring for Gears of War


Introduction


Developing mods for the Unreal engine can be an extremely rewarding task. In the current state of the games industry, there is little better a way for a hobbyist or aspiring game developer to show the world what he or she is capable of. This document is intended to give interested mod authors the information they need to successfully create modifications for Unreal Engine games such as Gears of War. It will include some technical information while covering some basics to help get started. If you work hard, you can get some fun stuff done through mod authoring.

For more information on getting started see the Getting Started (Mod Development Community) page.

Notes


The Gears of War editor is provided on an as-is basis and without any warranty of any kind, and it is unsupported by Epic and by Microsoft.

Respect the rights of others. By making custom content available, you acknowledge that you are solely responsible for that content. You agree that you have all necessary rights to make any content publicly available and that it complies with all applicable laws and does not violate the rights of any person or entity.

Publishing maps with Microsoft Vista might require that you start the game as an Administrator: To do this, go to Start, Run, and then type cmd. Right-click cmd, and then select Run as Administrator. Click Allow to elevate privileges. Go to the Game install directory (default C:\Program Files\Microsoft Games\Gears of War), create the map and then publish it (see Publishing below).

Some Advice to Start With


When you begin developing a mod you should start small. If you set goals that are too hard to reach, you'll get frustrated in the process of working towards them; and you may never be able to bring the vision to life. It is much better to set a series of small goals and work to each one in turn. Start with a simple idea that could be expanded into a larger game. Always work on small, manageable chunks that could each be released in their own right. If you do undertake a large project, organize your features into a release schedule. If your game is going to have 5 new weapons, make a release with 2 or 3 while your work on the others. Pace yourself and think about the long term.

Everyone has ideas. Everybody thinks they have a revolutionary new game concept that no one else has ever thought of. Having cool ideas will rarely get you anywhere in the games industry. You have to be able to implement your ideas or provide some useful skill. This also applies to mod authoring. If you become a skilled or notable mod author, you will find people propositioning you to implement their ideas. Never join a project whose idea man or leader has no obvious development skills. Never join a project that only has a web designer. You have your own ideas. Focus on them carefully and in small chunks and you will be able to develop cool projects.

Remember that developing a mod doesn't mean much if you never release it. Scale your task list so that you can release something quickly, adding and improving features as your mod matures. If you hold back your mod until everything is perfect, you'll find yourself never releasing anything.

Once you have your idea, you need to choose what kind of mod type is right for you. After that you can set everything up and begin making your visions a reality.

Setting up a Mod Project


It's time to get your hands dirty. First, you should understand how an Unreal Engine game is typically installed. After that, you should know where your mod fits in with game, and some of the ways the Unreal Engine treats content - both original and new. Then, depending on your approach, you can start to set up everything and begin creating your mod.

Directory Structure

By default, Gears of War will be installed to the following directory:

  C:\Program Files\Microsoft Games\Gears of War
  

Additionally, user settings will be stored for each user:

  C:\Documents and Settings\<userID>\My Documents\My Games\Gears of War for Windows\WarGame\
  

The game can be run by clicking the desktop shortcut icon, from the Start Menu, or via the following command:

  Startup
  

The game editor can be run from the Start Menu, or via the following command:

  Startup editor -cookededitor -installed
  

You can also copy the desktop shortcut icon, rename it to Gears of War Editor. Right-click the shortcut and select Properties to modify the Target:

  Startup editor -cookededitor -installed
  

For effect you can change the icon. Right-click the shortcut and select Properties. Click the Change Icon button and select the green editor button.

Packages

Packages are collections of game resources. The resources can be any of several types of assets: textures, models, animations sounds, music, UI scenes. The package format is the same for all resources and multiple resource types can be mixed in a package. For the sake of sanity, Gears of War splits up packages into resources. The Textures directory contains packages with textures, the Sounds directory contains packages with sounds and so forth. Even though these packages may contain different types of content, they have have the same file extention (.upk) and they are still the same kind of file.

See the Unreal Packages page for more information.

Programming

When getting started you'll need to do a lot of research on your own. You'll only become a solid UnrealScript programmer if you spend time to acquaint yourself with the framework and the code that is available to you. Learn creative ways to solve problems related to your mod design goals and empower yourself to maximize the tools that you have available.

UnrealScript Source Files

NOTE: UnrealScript source is not available for Gears of War and programming is not supported for the game.

Content Creation

Levels

When using the game editor, levels will be saved to the following directory:

  C:\Documents and Settings\<userID>\My Documents\My Games\Gears of War for Windows\WarGame\Unpublished\CookedPC\CustomContent\Maps
  

For your level to be visible in the game menus, it needs to be saved in a subdirectory of CustomContent (such as Maps). Anything saved directly in the CustomContent directory itself will be ignored. So, you’ll want create a directory that is appropriate to your mod name.

Remember when saving a level to do so with the right game mode prefix (such as SP_ or MP_).

By default, the game looks for custom content in the Published directory. You have two options:

  1. Tell the game to run out of the Unpublished directory by running with Setup.exe –useunpublished. This is best for fast turnaround time while developing.
  2. Use the Publish by Cooking button in the editor; this copies the contents of Unpublished to Published so the game will auto-detect it. (Faster to load, slower to publish)
  3. Use the Publish by Copying button in the editor; this copies the contents of Unpublished to Published so the game will auto-detect it. (Faster to publish, slower to load.)

The first time you run the game, it will detect the presence of new levels in subdirectories of the CustomMaps folder and automatically generate the per-level configuration (.ini) files for registering the level with the in-game UI. You can edit these to provide level description text, etc.

Publishing and Cooking

The CookedPC naming convention may seem confusing. It is legacy and it is best to just work with it. Publishing is what puts everything into the Published directory for distribution.

Regarding the Published and Unpublished behavior: content that is saved in the game editor is written to the Unpublished directory - the working directory for mod authors.

  C:\Documents and Settings\<userID>\My Documents\My Games\Gears of War for Windows\WarGame\UnPublished\CookedPC\
  C:\Documents and Settings\<userID>\My Documents\My Games\Gears of War for Windows\WarGame\UnPublished\CookedPC\CustomContent\Maps\
  C:\Documents and Settings\<userID>\My Documents\My Games\Gears of War for Windows\WarGame\UnPublished\CookedPC\CustomContent\Chars\
  C:\Documents and Settings\<userID>\My Documents\My Games\Gears of War for Windows\WarGame\UnPublished\CookedPC\Localization\<LANGUAGE>\
  

The game naturally runs from the Published directory, unless the -useunpublished flag is specified when running up the game. The typical mod workflow will be to iterate development on levels and content and run the game with -useunpublished. When the mod is ready, a final Publish will write cooked content to the Published directory, and these loading-optimised files will be used for distribution. Configuration and localized text files, they will have to be copied over manually.

Alternatively, mod authors can run their in-development content without the -useunpublished flag by issuing Publish when content changes are made. In this way, the mod content will be copied uncooked over to the Unpublished directory, where the game will automatically recognize it. As above, it is recommended that a final Publish is done before distributing a mod.

To summarize, the -useunpublished flag is a mod developer shortcut for not having to continually copy files while working.

Localization

A localized text file for your mod package should be created and placed in the following directory:

  C:\Documents and Settings\<userID>\My Documents\My Games\Gears of War\WarGame\UnPublished\CookedPC\Localization\<LANGUAGE>\YourModName.int
  

Distribution

Completed mods will simply packaged into a compressed archive using a utility such as WinRAR.

Naming Conventions

For consistency and maintainability, it's very wise to establish some naming conventions and other best practices such as coding standards early on in the development of your project. This will keep you and any team members on the same page.

When in doubt, take a look at the content that came with Gears of War for examples of how Epic sets things up.

The Available Mod Types


Custom Content

Regarding units and scale, here are some important things to consider:

  • Generally a "floor" of a building is a nice even 256 units.
  • Low cover is 96 Unreal Units (UU) tall; and must be shallower that 96 UU to mantle over it.
  • Marcus and other characters are 162 Unreal Units tall with a 50 UU-wide collision cylinder.

Typically, custom content such as characters and weapons can be created via Archetypes. Characters are represented by Pawn classes in the game: WarPawn. Weapons are represented similarly. In this way, you can change the character or weapon mesh to be the custom models that you have created an imported. Once created, everything can be set up via the Kismet Scripting system - the Pawn can be set to be possessed, and the weapons can be added to a player's inventory.

Levels

Of course, Levels are a great way to create new content without writing any code. You can simply carve out a new level and decorate it using existing content assets that came with the game; or you can create your own textures and models (static meshes), as well!

One of the most important things to remember about gameplay in Gears of War is the cover system. This is handled by using the CoverLink Actor. Place CoverLinks around any areas in the level in which you want bot characters to user for cover. Other relevant Actors include PathNodes, Triggers, and of course, PlayerStarts. Characters are placed as SkeletalMeshActors. Lighting can be handled with SpotLight, SpotLights, and PointLights; or any other Actor derived from Light.

Campaign

For campaign missions, you may want to use WarCheckpoint Actors for progress in your level, and CameraActors for some cinematics. Setting a PlayerStart as the primary one is also important.

For more single player levels, the process is unique - almost entirely iterative. Once an initial design is blocked out, you typically play things out, determine if the gameplay meets the design goals, revise as needed, and repeat until complete. Once gameplay design is complete, visual design can be implemented via decorating based on a concept.

Versus

For versus missions, a special type of PlayerStart is needed called WarTeamPlayerStart. Careful placement of these Actors is essential; and be sure to set the TeamIndex to a value of 0 or 1 for proper team arrangement. For additional weapon loadouts, you can place WarWeaponPickupFactory Actors and set the WeaponPickupClass to the class of the weapon you'd like to have spawned.

It is also a good idea to consider the gametype that your level is focused on. Here are the available gametypes:

  • Warzone - competitive, team-based match to the death (team deathmatch)
  • Assassination - assasinate the leader of the enemy team to win the match
  • Execution - execute your enemies to gain points.
  • Annex - capture and hold vital locations to gain points
  • King of the Hill - gain control over a fixed capture point

For more guidance on designing a multiplayer level, see the Multiplayer Map Theory (Gears of War) page.

Examples


You will start by creating a new level. From the File Menu select New.

You can edit the level properties by selecting World Properties from the View menu. Under the World Info section you can enter information such as Author and Title. For Versus levels, be sure to check bIsMultiplayerMap and GameTypesSupportedOnThisMap.

The valid list of supported GameTypes are:

  Class'WarefareGameContent.WarGameAnnex'
  Class'WarefareGameContent.WarGameConquest'
  Class'WarefareGameContent.WarGameKillTheLeader'
  Class'WarefareGameContent.WarGameResurrection'
  Class'WarefareGameContent.WarGameTDM'
  

Campaign Level

Basics

Floor

Right-click on the Cube Builder Brush to open the Builder Brush - Cube properties. Enter the following values:

  • X: 1024
  • Y: 1024
  • Z: 128

Click the Build button to create the brush. Click the "CSG: Add" button to add this floor geometry to the world.

Lights

To see better, you need at least one light. Right click on the top surface of the floor; from the context menu select Add Light (Point) from the Add Actor menu item. You may need to add more lights; or you can duplicate the selected light Actor by selecting Duplicate from the Edit Menu; or by pressing Ctrl+W.

Materials

To see the floor better, you need to apply a material. In the Generic Browser, check the Material filter. Right-click on a package such as COG_City_Architecture and select Fully Load from the context menu. Select a material such as COG_City_BaseMat_Metal_CP_Mat from the package. Right-click on the top surface of the floor and select Apply Material: COG_City_BaseMat_Metal_CP_Mat from the context menu. You can adjust the scale of the material by right-clicking on the floor again and selecting Surface Properties from the context menu. Be sure that the correct surface is selected.

Sky Dome

In the Generic Browser, open the SkyDomes package, located in the Environments\SkyDomes directory. If it is already opened; make sure it is fully loaded. Since Sky Domes are actually Static Meshes, you can check the Static Mesh filter. Select a sky dome static mesh such as NewSkyBox_DR_SMesh from the package. Right-click in a viewport and select Add StaticMesh: SkyDomes.NewSkyBox_DR_SMesh from the AddActor menu item on the context menu. The scale of the sky dome static mesh may need to be adjusted. Right-click on the actor and select StaticMeshActor Properties. Be sure that the correct actor is selected; and in this case, there should only be one, as you don't want to scale anything else. A value of 1.5 should make the dome fit better around the floor.

Player Start

Right-click on the top surface of the floor and select PlayerStart from the Add Actor menu item on the context menu.

Build

Select Build All from the Build Menu. If all went well, there should be no errors. If there are errors, either try to clean them up or start again.

Save

Select Save As... from the _File menu. Locate the Maps directory to save there. Give it an appropriate name. In this case, SP_Example is fine.

Test it out

Click the Play in Editor icon to run the game and start the example level.

Ambience and Decorations

Sounds

On the Actor Classes tab of the Generic Browser, the AmbientSound actor is a subclass of KeyPoint. Under AmbientSound is AmbientSoundSimple; and under that are other sound actor types. With AmbientSoundSimpleselected, right-click in the desired area of the level and select Add AmbientSoundSimple from the Add Actor menu item on the context menu.

Meshes

Meshes can be placed for decorating the level based on a desired visual style. In the Generic Browser, check the Static Mesh filter. find a package and select a static mesh from the package. Right-click in the desired area of the level and select _Add StaticMesh: _ from the context menu.

Cover

Setup

To set up cover, first find a Static Mesh for placement.

In the Generic Browser, check the Static Mesh filter. In the COG_Militech_Architecture_02 package select a static mesh such as COG_Militech_Timgad_W1_plantershort_SMesh from the package. Right-click on the top surface of the floor and select Add StaticMesh: COG_Militech_Architecture_02.COG_Militech_Timgad_W1_plantershort_SMesh from the context menu.

CoverLinks

If you were to test the level right now, your player would not have any cover context for the newly-placed static mesh. What is needed is a CoverLink actor.

Placement

On the Actor Classes tab of the Generic Browser, the CoverLink actor is a subclass of NavigationPoint. Under CoverLink is CoverLinkDynamic. With CoverLink selected, right-click on the Static Mesh and select Add CoverLink from the Add Actor menu item on the context menu. Make sure that it is facing the cover spot.

By default the CoverLink will have one slot - Slot 0. To add slots, simply edit the CoverLink properties by right clicking it and selecting CoverLink Properties from the context menu. The slot information is in the CoverLink section. Clicking the arrow will expand the current slot. By default there is only one. Clicking on the ellipse (...) will display a brackets icon and a green plus icon - both to the right. Use the plus icon to add Slots; the brackets will remove a slot. Finally, make sure the slots have a CoverType - either CT_Standing or CT_Midlevel.

CoverGroup

You can assign CoverLink actors to a CoverGroup. On the Actor Classes tab of the Generic Browser, the CoverLink actor is a subclass of Info. With CoverLink selected, right-click near the CoverLink actors to be grouped and select Add CoverLink from the Add Actor menu item on the context menu.

To add CoverLink actors to a CoverGroup, select the CoverLink actors, then right-click on the CoverGroup and select CoverGroup: Add Links from the Complex Options submenu in the Path Options menu item on the context menu.

Build

Select Build All from the Build Menu to rebuild the paths and lighting.

Note that if you have a long piece of cover, and you only place two Slots manually, building paths will automatically add more Slots to your CoverLink actor.

Editing Tips

You can also duplicate a slot using Duplicate from the Edit menu (or Ctrl+W), which saves time if the same type of cover is being used. Middle click adjusts the CoverLink to fit your surface and tries to flag everything correctly; and Alt-drag allows you to quickly duplicate a slot.

Right-clicking on a slot will reveal some of the more commonly-used flags in a context menu.

You can hold the "," key and click on the ground to place a new cover link as well.

Other Tips

When placing cover in the inside of a 90 degree corner, put 2 slots near the corner - one facing each wall. DO NOT make them overlap exactly - you're just asking for trouble when you rebuild cover because it's easy for the sorting algorithms to get confused as to which slot is connecting to the next.

If you've got an edge of cover and you're not able to make it correctly recognize that it should allow cover-slipping, (once you're sure it's not a collision issue) you can turn that cover link to manually update instead of auto update, then grab that outer cover slot you're trying to flag as cover-slip and rotate it very slightly to facing outwards, middle click to see if it accepts the coverslip, and repeat until it does. Rotating the coverslot 2-5 degrees off axis won't make a significant gameplay difference, but not being able to coverslip is very frustrating for many players.

AI will only take cover where there's a cover slot, not on the straight line areas between. This is why a long straight wall with 2 cover slots will auto-generate some slots between them. If you place some manually, those won't be there.

The CoverLink actor is part of the path network, just like the individual slots are. Try not to make the coverlink overlap the slots within that link, as it can confuse AI having 2 nodes on top of each other.

If you've already set up a cover area, you can move the location of the coverlink by holding TAB and CTRL down as you move the link around, that will leave the slots in place, and only move the master link object.

Regarding Cover groups... Instead of telling an AI guy to go to a specific cover slot, you can place the "Cover group" actor in an area, and reference an area of cover instead of a specific slot. A cover group can be set to contain every cover SLOT within a given radii, or you can manually select a bunch of CoverLinks and the cover group actor, then right-click on the group and tell it to add the selected cover links. A cover group can have a radii and manual links at the same time, the 2 methods aren't mutually exclusive. When a link is included in the cover group you'll see a dotted line from the cover group to all the links it references, that dotted line won't be there if it's using a radii, but those cover slots are still being referenced.

Flags set on a CoverLink are generally active for anywhere between two nodes. SO, picture this. You have a straight piece of cover with 4 slots on it. If only slot 3 has "allow mantle" on it, you will only be able to mantle if you're exactly on top of that slot. If slots 3 and 4 have mantling, then you'll be able to mantle anywhere between those slots. So, basically a single slot on a line isn't much use for a player in terms of setting property flags, it's unlikely they'll be EXACTLY on that slot (although AI will use it that precisely).

For single player people, be careful with streaming, it's pretty easy to accidentally rebuild cover when you don't have all you level chunks visible in the editor, which can easily screw up some of your cover as it tries to auto-align to things that "aren't there" currently.

Weapons

Weapon placement is handled by the WarWeaponPickupFactory actor.

Placement

On the Actor Classes tab of the Generic Browser, the PickupFactory actor is a subclass of NavigationPoint. Under PickupFactory is WarPickupFactory. This allows for different factory types specific to Gears of War, such as weapons and ammo. Select WarWeaponPickupFactory, right-click on the top floor surface and select Add WarWeaponPickupFactory from the Add Actor menu item on the context menu. Initially this actor will be of no use until you set the desired weapon that should be spawned - the WeaponPickupClass. To set the weapon, simply edit the WarWeaponPickupFactory properties by right clicking it and selecting WarWeaponPickupFactory Properties from the context menu. The WeaponPickupClass property is in the WarWeaponPickupFactory section.

Build

Select Build All from the Build Menu to rebuild the new paths created from adding this actor.

Scripting

Gameplay scripting is done via Kismet in the editor. Click the icon on the main toolbar to open Kismet. Typically, gameplay is scripted through events and actions, as well as various conditions.

Triggers

Triggers are a common way to interact with events and actions in a level.

Right-click on the top floor surface and select Add Trigger from the Add Actor menu item on the context menu. Other Trigger actors are available. On the Actor Classes tab of the Generic Browser, locate Trigger. There you will see other subclasses of the Trigger class.

In Kismet, you can handle events for the recently-placed Trigger Actor. Right-click in the editor workspace area and on the context menu you will see New Event Using Trigger0. There are several event menu items available, such as Touch.

AI

Both CoverLinks and Weapons are part of the AI path network - they are both subclasses of the NavigationPoint actor. AI can be used for enemies or for teammates.

Path Nodes

Right-click on the top floor surface and select Add Path Node from the Add Actor menu item on the context menu. It's a good idea to duplicate the Path Node actor and put them around your level.

Trigger

Place a Trigger actor in your level.

Scripting

Open Kismet...

This can get involved; but here is a basic set up..

Right-click in the workspace area and select the AIFactory menu item from the AI submenu of the New Action menu on the context menu. In the properties for the AIFactory Action, find the SpawnSets property. Here you can choose the type of AI that will be spawned. In the level, select the possible areas for spawning the AI - typically via Path Node actors. Right-click on the Spawn Points output for the AIFactory Action and select New Object Vars Using... from the context menu.

To trigger the AIFactory to spawn you can do something such as create a Kismet Event for Level loaded and visible so they'll spawn at the start of the map; or reate a Touch Event for the Trigger actor in your level.

Checkpoints

There isn't an elegant solution for working with checkpoints - they are mostly kismet driven in nature, so they can be a bit script intensive.

Placement

On the Actor Classes tab of the Generic Browser, the WarCheckPoint actor is a subclass of PathNode, which is a subclass of NavigationPoint. With WarCheckPoint selected, right-click near the in the desired area of the level and select Add WarCheckPoint from the Add Actor menu item on the context menu.

Scripting

In general, always use the Event called Level Loaded and Visible instead of Level Beginning, which is outdated. It was left in to avoid breaking anything that was accidentally using the old Event.

In Kismet right-click in the workspace area. The Set Active Checkpoint Action can be found under the Warfare submenu on the context menu. Connect the output of Level Loaded and Visible to the input on Set Active Checkpoint. With the checkpoint actor selected, right click on the bottom of the Event and select New Object Var Using WarCheckpoint0 from the context menu.

When Set Active Checkpoint is triggered it will automatically fire off the Checkpoint Activated event. From there, you can script other Actions to occur, such as clearing the checkpoint, opening a new pathway and more.

Checkpoints don't work in PIE (Play-in-Editor). So you need to exit the editor and actually try the map in the normal game to verify if it's working, and you need a valid player profile, as well.

Cinematics

Streaming

Multiplayer maps consist of one level. You can make each room for a multiplayer map as a separate streaming level and then combine it all at the end.

Single player maps can be split up and tricks like that to make things easier for iterating over creating sections of the level. For example, in many of the included maps, there are multiple "_P" maps with only some sub levels added. This was done by some level designers so they could work and quickly rebuild to look at lighting without having to rebuild the entire map over and over.

Versus Level

Basics

Floor

Right-click on the Cube Builder Brush to open the Builder Brush - Cube properties. Enter the following values:

  • X: 2048
  • Y: 1024
  • Z: 128

Click the Build button to create the brush. Click the "CSG: Add" button to add this floor geometry to the world.

Lights

To see better, you need at least one light. Right click on the top surface of the floor; from the context menu select Add Light (Point) from the Add Actor menu item. You may need to add more lights; or you can duplicate the selected light Actor by selecting Duplicate from the Edit Menu; or by pressing Ctrl+W.

Materials

To see the floor better, you need to apply a material. In the Generic Browser, check the Material filter. Right-click on a package such as COG_City_Architecture and select Fully Load from the context menu. Select a material such as COG_City_BaseMat_Metal_CP_Mat from the package. Right-click on the top surface of the floor and select Apply Material: COG_City_BaseMat_Metal_CP_Mat from the context menu. You can adjust the scale of the material by right-clicking on the floor again and selecting Surface Properties from the context menu. Be sure that the correct surface is selected.

Sky Dome

In the Generic Browser, open the SkyDomes package, located in the Environments\SkyDomes directory. If it is already opened; make sure it is fully loaded. Since Sky Domes are actually Static Meshes, you can check the Static Mesh filter. Select a sky dome static mesh such as NewSkyBox_DR_SMesh from the package. Right-click in a viewport and select Add StaticMesh: SkyDomes.NewSkyBox_DR_SMesh from the AddActor menu item on the context menu. The scale of the sky dome static mesh may need to be adjusted. Right-click on the actor and select StaticMeshActor Properties. Be sure that the correct actor is selected; and in this case, there should only be one, as you don't want to scale anything else. A value of 1.5 should make the dome fit better around the floor.

Player Starts

On the Actor Classes tab of the Generic Browser, the PlayerStart actor is a subclass of NavigationPoint. Under PlayerStart is WarTeamPlayerStart. This allows for players to join either the COG or the Locust team. Select WarTeamPlayerStart, right-click on the top floor surface and select Add WarTeamPlayerStart from the Add Actor menu item on the context menu. By default, the team will be zero. To set the team, simply edit the WarTeamPlayerStart properties by right clicking it and selecting WarTeamPlayerStart Properties from the context menu. The Team property is in the WarTeamPlayerStart section.

It's best to place a couple Player Starts per team, usually with either team at one end of the level.

Build

Select Build All from the Build Menu. If all went well, there should be no errors. If there are errors, either try to clean them up or start again.

Save

Select Save As... from the _File menu. Locate the Maps directory to save there. Give it an appropriate name. In this case, MP_Example is fine.

Test it out

Click the Play in Editor icon to run the game and start the example level.

Custom Characters

To assist in getting started with creating custom characters for Gears of War, the following skeleton is available for reference: